April 8, 2024 Total Solar Eclipse

theterminator93

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What, when, and where is it?
I'll be hosting a viewing party for the April 8, 2024 eclipse at my home. Eclipse day is a Monday - so you will need to arrange a long weekend with your employer.

I am located in North Ridgeville, OH - a western suburb of Cleveland. I live about 3 minutes from the nearest I-80 and I-480 interchanges and an easy 20 minutes from the CLE airport. There are numerous lodgings nearby as well.

From my location, the eclipse starts and ends at 1:58 and 4:30 PM, respectively. I am very close to the center of the eclipse path which will afford a near full-duration view of totality; just under 4 minutes from 3:13-3:17. Put in perspective, totality for the eclipse in 2017 lasted less than 2 minutes from our vantage point at Grog6's house.


Why is this posted so early?
I know we're still 7 months away, but I wanted to get this thread started now as a place to collect and post relevant info, record interest and have information available for those who may be interested in attending. With work schedules and PTO lead times varying wildly, I figured posting this early meant nobody would be left out because I didn't give enough time in advance to plan.

Furthermore, local news outlets are predicting horrendous traffic and suggest both arriving/departing on any day other than eclipse day, and booking your accommodations early.


What can I expect?
Several of us went to spend time with Grog6 in 2017 for the eclipse that year - despite the heat, humidity and unpredictable weather we were presented with some amazing views. The 2024 eclipse will be the last total solar eclipse visible for the US until ~2045, so if you missed out on 2017's eclipse, be sure you plan to see this one!

Full.jpg
Mosaic of photos I took in 2017


Crew.jpg
A handful of us at Grog's place in Tennessee in 2017 with my 2 solar filter equipped scopes

Aside from the eclipse itself, there are a number of Cleveland-area attractions that may be of interest if you want to fill a weekend.

The Lorain Assembly Plant, where all MN12s were put together (well, except some of you 30th anniversary Cougar guys!), is about 25 minutes away. The center of the plant was demolished and it's two separate sections now, used as a distribution warehouse and neither is really "open" for the public to drive around. Some sections near the facility afford a place to park for a short visit though.
In Cleveland itself there are a number of things which may be of interest. There's the Rock and Roll Hall-of-Fame, Cleveland Museum of Art and Cleveland Orchestra is at Severance Hall. Also in the city are the zoo, Botanical Gardens, Christmas Story house and West Side Market. For those into history, Lake View Cemetery is where you will find John D. Rockefeller and James A. Garfield. Football fans can find the Pro Football Hall-of-Fame an hour away in Canton.
The Kalahari resort and indoor water park is about an hour west near Sandusky. Out that ways is also Milan - home to Thomas Edison's birthplace and museum.
There are tons of excellent ethnic restaurants and bars to choose from.
I'm always eager to take friends up for airplane rides too; flights along the shoreline of Lake Erie seem to be my specialty. There are plenty of beaches along the lake, but in April the water will be about 40 degrees, so swimming is out!


What about the weather?
Weather here in early April has a moderate, however uncertain, chance of being favorable for eclipse viewing. Historically about 50% of the time it's overcast, and 25% of the time there are clear skies. Temperatures can vary wildly, but generally the highs are in the 50s with lows in the upper 30s. A rough favorable/unfavorable call can be made within a week of the event, with a more certain judgment as the weekend approaches.

With clear skies, views should be similar to what I posted above. The location of the sun during the eclipse will be in a wide-open section of the sky with no nearby obstructions (trees etc.).

The forecast indicates temperatures climbing up towards 70, moderate winds out of the south, clouds decreasing throughout the morning and afternoon to 30-40% coverage we approach eclipse time.


What will be provided? What will you need to bring?
I will provide soft drinks and refreshments - I'm not a griller but I'll provide something we can munch on. If there's anything you want to bring to eat or share, please do.
I have a few pairs of eclipse glasses left over from 2017, though you should plan to bring your own to be safe.
I'm also enthusiastic to set up and show off my 9-seat home theater. I have a selection of several hundred movies and a few dozen games for the Switch and older consoles.

I have three telescopes:
11" Schmidt-Cassegrain
8" Newtonian Reflector
5" Schmidt-Cassegrain

The two smaller units, the 8" Dobsonian and 5.5" SCT, I have solar filters for that will allow magnified views of the sun during the event. I don't have a solar filter for the 11" SCT, however it can be used at night for high-magnification views of the night sky if anyone's still around by then.

You will need to bring any hard beverages you want to drink, as well as a lawn blanket/chair.
If you are flying in and need any help setting up local transportation, let me know.


Lodging Information
There are 2 basic motels about 3 minutes away. Reviews are mediocre but they are inexpensive and very close.
There is a much larger variety of (nicer) hotels around the nearby Great Northern Mall.

Here's a Google Maps link to the nearest places to set up for a night or two:



For now, I'll start a list of members who will plan on attending. If you're interested post up and let me know how many would be coming! As we get closer and schedules firm, undoubtedly some won't be able to make it. However I'll send my contact information out to everyone knows they'll be coming at least a few days ahead of time.

I'm looking forward to seeing another eclipse, but the centerpiece of this day will certainly be the opportunity to meet up with fellow BirdCats peeps, rain-or-shine.



Attendees
theterminator93 (2)
MadMikeyL (3)
 
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Although I'd love to make the trek to check out the eclipse through your telescopes, it's just too far for the limited vacation time that I have.

I'm hoping to find a place in Southern Illinois that's closer to my house. I'm hoping to grab some pictures if the weather cooperates.

This is my favorite picture from last time...we got lucky and the clouds mostly broke to allow the shot
 

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A #14 welding filter is also good to use for direct viewing. When we had one in the 70's, they were recommending a #10 lens; I wonder if the sun got brighter, or the original recommendation was too light? I still have the #10 lens I used then, and it is uncomfortable, but I don't remember it being so back then. I didn't go blind, but I'd go with a #14. The filters Brandon has on the scopes are perfect. :)
 
Just a little over three months to go. Winter has been mild so far, maybe that will mean we get an early spring with less clouds? :unsure:

My wife and I confirmed that we both have eclipse day off work; she had to wait for the calendar to flip to 2024 to request time for this year. If you're hoping to come, now's the time to check in with your employers and get some time off! :biggrin:
 
Just a little over three months to go. Winter has been mild so far, maybe that will mean we get an early spring with less clouds? :unsure:

My wife and I confirmed that we both have eclipse day off work; she had to wait for the calendar to flip to 2024 to request time for this year. If you're hoping to come, now's the time to check in with your employers and get some time off! :biggrin:

Unfortunately, I think April is going to be impossible for me. But, as we discussed previously, I plan on being up there in June. We can discuss details as it gets closer.
The diamond ring. A classic! Mine has a bit of lens flare and was a longer exposure.

View attachment 546

Cut that exposure by a third or half and you'll have a really sweet shot!
 
No worries Ron, I know your schedule fluctuates about as much as the weather does up here! It was great finally getting to meet up in the fall. :zbeer:

Funny thing about that particular diamond ring shot from 2017... I had two cameras set up to record/photograph the event. I had my DSLR, a Nikon D5300, mounted to the back of the Celestron NexStar 5SE scope (with a full-aperture solar filter) using a T-adapter. Then on a cheap tripod I had a point-and-shoot Canon with a homemade solar filter.

The DLSR was running a script I wrote in advance while attached to my laptop. It was taking a photo every minute (IIRC). Then as we reached totality, I took the solar filter off the telescope and switched programs for the camera. It grabbed a sequence of progressively longer exposure shots (a group of 3 of each exposure) for me to build a composite image in PS later. Unfortunately, the totality script ran longer than totality lasted (can't remember if I got started late, or I mis-measured the time it would take for it to finish running the script) and it was taking long exposure shots as the sun started peeking out from behind the moon, and those exposures were way too long and I couldn't use them. The diamond ring image here is the first one that it grabbed after I took off the solar filter. Another challenge was that with the focal length of the scope, I was a touch too far on the telephoto side of each image - even with the use of my focal reducer. So some of the corona wasn't visible due to that.

Here's a glance at what each of those photos looked like:
ec.jpg

At the last minute I found a guide for creating a time-lapse mosaic of the eclipse - taking photos at predetermined times/intervals. So I manually took those photos and set the exposure accordingly on the point-and-shoot. After I kicked off the DLSR totality program I took a few photos using the point-and-shoot. Ironically it's the point-and-shoot photos that got used when I did the eclipse mosaic that is in the first post - with the exception of the center image for totality. The DSLR images I used to create a time-lapse video and an HDR composite image of the eclipse.

This is the time-lapse video of the DSLR images. The section that ran after the solar filter came off starts about 28 seconds in:

 
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While you were doing that, I was glued to your 8" dobs, and I watched a really cool solar flare in realtime. I'll never forget it, that's for sure. :) I'm really glad we got to do the party; that was before my health problems.
 
No worries Ron, I know your schedule fluctuates about as much as the weather does up here! It was great finally getting to meet up in the fall. :zbeer:

Funny thing about that particular diamond ring shot from 2017... I had two cameras set up to record/photograph the event. I had my DSLR, a Nikon D5300, mounted to the back of the Celestron NexStar 5SE scope (with a full-aperture solar filter) using a T-adapter. Then on a cheap tripod I had a point-and-shoot Canon with a homemade solar filter.

The DLSR was running a script I wrote in advance while attached to my laptop. It was taking a photo every minute (IIRC). Then as we reached totality, I took the solar filter off the telescope and switched programs for the camera. It grabbed a sequence of progressively longer exposure shots (a group of 3 of each exposure) for me to build a composite image in PS later. Unfortunately, the totality script ran longer than totality lasted (can't remember if I got started late, or I mis-measured the time it would take for it to finish running the script) and it was taking long exposure shots as the sun started peeking out from behind the moon, and those exposures were way too long and I couldn't use them. The diamond ring image here is the first one that it grabbed after I took off the solar filter. Another challenge was that with the focal length of the scope, I was a touch too far on the telephoto side of each image - even with the use of my focal reducer. So some of the corona wasn't visible due to that.

Here's a glance at what each of those photos looked like:
View attachment 3077

At the last minute I found a guide for creating a time-lapse mosaic of the eclipse - taking photos at predetermined times/intervals. So I manually took those photos and set the exposure accordingly on the point-and-shoot. After I kicked off the DLSR totality program I took a few photos using the point-and-shoot. Ironically it's the point-and-shoot photos that got used when I did the eclipse mosaic that is in the first post - with the exception of the center image for totality. The DSLR images I used to create a time-lapse video and an HDR composite image of the eclipse.

This is the time-lapse video of the DSLR images. The section that ran after the solar filter came off starts about 28 seconds in:


Yes, it was great finally getting to meet up and visit. :zbeer:

Very impressive. Yeah, figuring exposures can be tricky on the fly. Its' best to adjust the exposure manually using the camera's light meter prior to each shot. But, wow! You nailed most of the shots with your script. I'd say using the exposures on those photos you should be able to make the necessary adjustments for this year's eclipse. Overall you got some great and amazing shots of that eclipse!

Canon has a firmware hack that has a time-lapse script written into it. It's this script that I use for my time-lapse work.
 
I still have all of the raw photos everyone sent me on the main system; I'll make sure I put them on the hard drive I bring to the party full of movies.
 
I let my brother borrow my 8" Dob scope a couple years ago, along with all my lenses and accessories. I'll be heading over to pick them up in the next week or two, then I need to get re-acquainted with setting up the 5" computerized scope for equatorial tracking. I still need to do some test runs and re-learn all the equipment - especially if there's anything I need to buy.

With 3 minutes and 50 seconds of totality, there should be plenty of time for me to capture great photos and take it in with my eyes.

Here is the timing of events timed for my precise location:

Eclipse start: 1:58:48 PM (55° alt, 193° S)
Totality start: 3:13:16 PM (49° alt, 221° SW)
Totality midpoint: 3:15:12 PM (49° alt, 222° SW)
Totality end: 3:17:06 PM (49° alt, 223° SW)
Eclipse end: 4:28:39 PM (38° alt, 242° SW)

The moon will come from the lower right, moving up and slightly to the left as it transits in front of the sun.

I'll be sending some PMs to those who have said they will be coming sometime in the next 4-6 weeks, just to confirm and share some additional details.
 
OOh! I may be driving then! It would be awesome If I could drive up. Either I drive the red one, or I load Lazarus full of parts. :)
 
Six weeks from today! I would love to join you. However, according to Google maps it is about 2400 miles each way. But it is an event not to be missed.
In 2017 here in Seattle we did not have complete totality, but we did have 92%. I thought it was awesome. Got 5 degrees cooler too.
 
The 2017 one passed right over my house with full totality. Was definitely a sight to see.
 
Round trip (nonstop) fights to Cleveland from Seattle are about $250. ;)

I brought my 8" dob scope and all the lenses, filters and such back home from my brother's place a couple weeks ago. I also got a piggyback mount for my DLSR to use on the computerized SCT, rather than using the T-adapter (for a better, wider-angle shot).

Long-range forecasts indicate a warmer-than-usual spring for us, which might mean a higher-than-usual chance of sunny skies. :cool:
 
Although I'd love to make the trek to check out the eclipse through your telescopes, it's just too far for the limited vacation time that I have.

I'm hoping to find a place in Southern Illinois that's closer to my house. I'm hoping to grab some pictures if the weather cooperates.

This is my favorite picture from last time...we got lucky and the clouds mostly broke to allow the shot
Not sure what trail(s) we're doing yet, but a couple friends and I will be hiking in IL that morning then viewing the eclipse that afternoon.
 
I think those who have already said they're coming are good to go, but all the same.....



CLEVELAND (WJW) – Six weeks away from the total solar eclipse, hotels across Northeast Ohio are selling out.

The Drury as well as the Hampton Inn Downtown Cleveland are booked and closer to the path of totality, the longest view of the eclipse happening in Lorain County, time is running out to reserve a room.

“If you’re looking for a place to stay, don’t wait because you won’t have one,” said Pam LawHorn, Assistant general manager at Fairfield by Marriott in Avon. “A lot of it when I talk to them, they’re like, ‘I don’t want to miss the eclipse. I’m coming just for the eclipse’ and they’re bringing their whole family. They’re coming from everywhere.”

The last time area hotels saw this type of a boost in reservations, Lawhorn said, was the Republican National Convention in 2016. Eclipse tourism is expected to surpass that level of demand.

“The good news is it’s on Monday, so we’re going to have people coming on Friday night, Saturday night, Sunday night,” said Anthony Gallo, president of the Lorain County Chamber of Commerce.

Gallo said the eclipse could bring in hundreds of thousands of dollars to the county, stimulating restaurants, retail and hotels. He said the chamber is encouraging restaurants that would typically be closed on Mondays to open with limited menus to help assist with tourism demand.

“Those outside dollars coming into Lorain County is what it’s all about,” Gallo said.
 
Not sure what trail(s) we're doing yet, but a couple friends and I will be hiking in IL that morning then viewing the eclipse that afternoon.
There are some good trails in Giant City State Park, but I imagine that place will be packed.
 
One month to go! In 2-3 weeks the long-range forecasts should start to congeal and give us an idea of what to expect.

As for recent historic weather on April 8....
  • 2023: Mostly clear, 53°
  • 2022: Cloudy/rain, 47°
  • 2021: Partly cloudy, 81°
  • 2020: Fair skies, 64°
  • 2019: Cloudy, 66°
  • 2018: Fair skies, 35°
  • 2017: Fair skies, 57°
  • 2016: Mostly cloudy, 40°
  • 2015: Cloudy, 51°
  • 2014: Fair skies, 53°
  • 2013: Mostly cloudy, 70°
  • 2012: Partly cloudy, 59°
  • 2011: Cloudy, 49°
  • 2010: Cloudy, 50°
  • 2009: Fair skies, 48°
  • 2008: Mostly cloudy, 63°
  • 2007: Cloudy, 30°
 
We're 10 days out, and weather forecasts are starting to agree with one another as to what can be expected on the 8th.

I'll keep the first post up-to-date with the current forecast for my location as it updates each day. But for now, consensus is temps in the mid-60s, a moderate southwest breeze and partly cloudy skies; cloudiness increasing towards sunset. It looks like more widespread clouds will be moving in overnight, but from what I can see, the clouds in the early afternoon should be sparse enough for us to be able to see what's going on. :)

Weather for the weekend preceding looks great too; sunny or partly cloudy each day in the low 50s. Great flying and driving weather!
 
I'm putting the finishing touches on testing out the settings I'll use for my DSLR for the totality photography script. I've got a slightly revised version of the 2017 script ready. I have tested the timing, in hopes that I trigger the sequence at exactly the right moment to get a few good shots of Baily's Beads and the diamond ring effect.

There are major key differences between how I photographed the 2017 eclipse and how I plan to photograph the one on Monday...

First and foremost, in 2017, I had my DSLR attached at prime focus in the back of the 5SE telescope. This turned the telescope into a 5" aperture telephoto lens for the camera. The telescope itself is F/10 with a focal length of 1250mm, but it was too narrow for photographing totality so I used a F/6.3 reducer to bring the focal length down to an effective 788mm. I was able to pre-set the focus on the camera during filtered observations of the sun.

I had the DSLR taking a photo every 6 seconds or so, which I used to create a time-lapse video of the entire eclipse. For Monday's eclipse, I will be using the point-and-shoot camera with a modified firmware doing the time-lapse shots, then I'll use the DSLR with a 300mm lens to capture totality.

For the point-and-shoot, it's a pretty easy setup as I'm just re-using the exposure settings from 2017. For the DSLR, it's more complicated because now I have the camera behind a different lens, different focal length, different aperture, and different solar filter.

I plan to get a couple shots of the sun later today through the 5SE's solar filter (after it clears up a bit) and find the correct F-stop on my 300mm lens to mimic the exposure of the time-lapse photos from 2017. My hope is that by keeping the solar filter, ISO and shutter speed the same and only varying the aperture, that I can find the exposure bias from the F/6.3 reduced 5SE to the 300mm lens. Once that's done and with the F-stop set, I'll be able to get the same exposures of totality that I got in 2017 with the same ISO and shutter speed.

For focus, I'll auto-focus on the sun through the filter, then switch to manual focus and let it be. This will prevent the camera from trying to autofocus between each shot during the script, which would put my timing at risk and also introduce the potential for out-of-focus shots!

Weather will be cloudy to start, with clouds thinning out to 40-50% coverage around eclipse time. Fingers crossed!

Here's my table for the ISO and shutter speed settings, for those with a knack for photography. I've settled on F/13 for the DSLR, which gives me ample room to adjust the RAWs either way in Photoshop. The point-and-shoot JPEG below is as-is from the camera (aside from reduced resolution); the DSLR image was dropped 2 stops (basically F/16) in post-processing.

Focal LengthLens ApertureF-stopISOExposure timeComment
300mm23mmF/132001/60Filtered sun
300mm23mmF/131001/4000Baily's Beads
300mm23mmF/131001/60Diamond Ring
300mm23mmF/131001/2500Prominences
300mm23mmF/132001/1250Lower Corona
300mm23mmF/132001/160Inner Corona
300mm23mmF/132001/80Inner Corona
300mm23mmF/132001/20Middle Corona
300mm23mmF/132001/10Upper Corona
300mm23mmF/132001/6Outer Corona
300mm23mmF/132001/2.5Outer Corona
300mm23mmF/132001Outer Corona
300mm23mmF/132002Earthshine
165mm29mm5.61001/320SX530 filtered (timelapse)

Here are images from today's alignment test (had to get both cameras, piggyback'd on the 5SE, aligned to the sun with the scope) at the above settings.

d5300.jpg

sx530hs.jpg

And here is the script itself, which runs user-installed library gphoto2, inside an Ubuntu VM on my laptop:

Bash:
# syntax script.sh 0 2
# 0 seconds between exposures, 2 exposures of each.

            intval=${1};

            NoOf_Re=${2};

if [ -t 0 ]; then stty -echo -icanon -icrnl time 0 min 0; fi

sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config capturetarget=1 --set-config iso=200;

count=0
keypress=''

if [ -t 0 ]; then stty sane; fi

    read -p "Press Enter at C2 - 15 seconds (3:17:02) to begin program, starting with Diamond Ring then Baily's Beads. Diamond Ring will be photographed from 17:05-10, Baily's Beads from 17:13-17. Totality sequence immediately follows, starting at C2 3:17:17."

    echo "Diamond Ring: 1/60s, ISO 100"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do
            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config capturetarget=1 --set-config /main/capturesettings/capturemode=1 --set-config /main/capturesettings/burstnumber=3 --set-config iso=100;
            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/60 --trigger-capture;
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "C2 Baily's Beads: 1/4000, ISO 100"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do
            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config capturetarget=1 --set-config /main/capturesettings/capturemode=1 --set-config /main/capturesettings/burstnumber=5 --set-config iso=100;
            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/4000 --trigger-capture;
            sleep $intval;
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "Prominences, 1/2500, ISO 100"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do
            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/capturemode=0 --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/2500 --trigger-capture;
   
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "Lower Corona, 1/1250, ISO 200"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do

            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config capturetarget=1 --set-config iso=200;
            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/1250 --trigger-capture;

            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "Inner Corona, 1/160, ISO 200"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do
            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/160 --trigger-capture;
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "Inner Corona, 1/80, ISO 200"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do

            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/80 --trigger-capture;
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "Middle Corona, 1/20, ISO 200"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do

            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/20 --trigger-capture;
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "Upper Corona, 1/10, ISO 200"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do

            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/10 --trigger-capture;
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "Outer Corona, 1/6, ISO 200"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do

            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/6 --trigger-capture;
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "Outer Corona 2, 1/2.5, ISO 200"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do

            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/2.5 --trigger-capture;          
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "Outer Corona 3, 1s, ISO 200"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do

            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1 --trigger-capture;
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "Earthshine, 2s, ISO 200"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do

            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=2 --trigger-capture;
            sleep $intval;
        done

    read -p "Press Enter at C3 - 10 seconds (3:16:57) to begin post-totality Baily's Beads and Diamond Ring. Baily's Beads photography from 17:00 until 17:07, then Diamond Ring from 17:10 to 17:15."

    echo "C3 Baily's Beads and Chromosphere: 1/4000, ISO 100"
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do
            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config capturetarget=1 --set-config /main/capturesettings/capturemode=1 --set-config /main/capturesettings/burstnumber=5 --set-config iso=100;
            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/4000 --trigger-capture;
            sleep $intval;
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo "Diamond Ring: 1/60s, ISO 100, 6 exposures."
    for ((i=${NoOf_Re}; i>0; i--));
        do
            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config capturetarget=1 --set-config /main/capturesettings/capturemode=1 --set-config /main/capturesettings/burstnumber=3 --set-config iso=100;
            sudo gphoto2 --camera="Nikon DSC D5300" --set-config /main/capturesettings/shutterspeed2=1/60 --trigger-capture;
            sleep $intval;
        done

    echo -e "\nFinished with exposure program."

if [ -t 0 ]; then stty sane; fi
exit 0;
 
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Hope the clouds disburse for you all! I'll be checking out the minor eclipse here.
 
We have a 16% chance of seeing the sun here.
 
Have a great time today everyone!

This is all that's been on the news for weeks. Here in my area it's expected to be 93% totality, where in northern Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine they will be at 100%. State officials there are warning people there that traffic will be a nightmare once this is over.

Weather will be cooperating today too. :thumbsup:

Joe
 

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